ROMANTIC WOMEN'S FICTION . . . WITH A PARANORMAL TWIST . . .

Saturday, January 16, 2010

Saturday Snippet

I hate that my blogging has become so sporadic because even now when I do, I notice I'm losing my commenters and readers, so please come back!!! Puhleeeeeessseee!!!!

For fun today...on this rainy Saturday here in Southeast Texas, here's a snippet of my wip... To put you there, mc Dani and her teen daughter Riley are going to Dani's elderly friend's house for dinner and her great-nephew (Riley's age) will be there, and Riley is balking at it. Thinks the town (Dani's hometown) they've come back to is a hick town.


Riley and I were going to Miss Olivia’s for dinner. The elusive Grady had evidently arrived so she was ready for company. I was ready to relax.

Riley, on the other hand, acted like I’d signed her up for the Army.

“God, it’s a set up, Mom,” she said, stomping back and forth from her room to mine. Mine had the better bathroom.

“No, it’s not.”

“Bullshit.”

“Watch your mouth.”

I got a disgusted sigh as she tossed her mascara on the counter.

“Please! I mean she seems nice and all, but I am not going to go sit on the porch and drink lemonade with some hayseed hick.”

I choked back a chuckle. “Who said anything about lemonade?”

“I’m just telling you--”

“Look, we are going because my oldest, dearest friend invited us to dinner. I’m not asking you to wear a party dress and pearls, okay? Go goth and scare the crap out of him, I don’t care. But act right.”

“Whatever,” she mumbled. “Where are all your friends, by the way?”

I stopped, straight iron halfway to my head. “What?”

“I haven’t seen you talk to anyone or run across anyone other than this old lady. That you appear to like, anyway. I mean, everyone couldn’t have left like you did, did they?”

I blinked and opened my mouth to say--something. But that something told me we had ten minutes and it wasn’t the time. Again. I went back to mauling my hair.

“Yeah, I guess they did.”

“Well, I can’t say I blame any of you.”

Standing on Miss Olivia’s still-green porch with my sulky daughter was surreal. Like stepping back in time. Except for the lock on the door. That was new.

The hunk suddenly appearing on the other side of the screen was new, too. I bit my bottom lip to keep from laughing as I watched Riley’s eyeballs fall out of her head.

He held open the screen door for us, and I winked at her as I walked past her and touched her cheek.

“Close your mouth, boog,” I whispered. “Mosquitos are bad.”

I didn’t even get an eye roll. I think all her body parts were in shock. So much for hayseed.

“You must be Grady,” I said, offering my hand to the at-least-six-foot-or-more beautiful boy-man standing in front of me.

“Yes ma’am.”

Which was good until he just squeezed my fingers.

“Oh, no.” Couldn’t help myself. Must have been that house. “Look sweetie, take my hand.” I grabbed his hand and showed the stunned kid how to do it properly.

“Oh, kill me now,” I heard Riley mumble behind me.

“Careful what you wish for,” Miss Olivia said, entering the room with a plate of warm brownies.

Grady took his bewildered look to his aunt, who gave him no slack.

“Learn something there, boy,” she gestured to me. “Shake a woman’s hand like you mean it. Not like she’s some frail, inferior creature.”

All his good looks dissolved into panic mode. “I--I wasn’t--”

“I know all that, boy. Just relax.” She shoved the plate at him. “Now go on and introduce yourself proper.”

He grabbed the plate and stared at it as if it could rescue him. I held out my hand again.

“Hi, Grady, I’m Dani Shane.”

The poor guy grinned crookedly and grabbed my hand in a death grip.

“Grady Grader.”

I heard Riley’s brain whirl, I swear I did. She wouldn’t be able to resist it.

“Seriously?” she piped in from behind me.

He pried his fingers loose and I watched his eyes do a similar dance to hers as he settled on Riley. Except his went North to South and back again. I turned to see a mischievous light spark up in her face as she did the up-and-down thing right back at him. His crooked grin got bigger and he laughed quietly.

“Yeah. My parents thought that was cool.”

“Drugs?”

“Psychosis.”

They laughed and were instant friends. I watched her in awe. Even in the presence of a guy that turned her insides to goo, she was savvy and witty and sharp. I envied her that. I would have been a babbling idiot.

“Y’all want some lemonade?” Miss Olivia asked.

I glanced at Riley and chuckled to myself. At that point, she would have drank lemonade hanging upside down from a tree if he asked her to.

1 comment:

Janna Qualman said...

I'm still here! Promise.

Sharla, I really do love what you've got going with this. I remember at least one other snippet, and I love the feel between mom and daughter. You've got a little bit of unique flow, too, and I really like that. Well done!